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Feature & Comment

How civil unrest affects Maldives tourism

The Maldives tourism industry, famous for its secluded hotels, has traditionally been shielded from unrest in the capital. But continuing bad press, generated by years of political turmoil is beginning to have an effect, tour operators say.

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Killed, exiled or deposed

There were only two ways to dethrone a Maldivian ruler, according to historian and linguist Naseema Mohamed. “One is death, natural or assassination, and the other by a coup d’état.”

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Maldives: state of insanity – part II

When a president with an army at his command and an armoury at his disposal has a bad trip or an episode of intense paranoia, the consequences can be markedly different from when an ordinary person has such experiences, writes Azra Naseem in the second part of the Finifenmaa blast chronicles.

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The rule of fear in the Republic

With the ratification of the new anti-terror law, anyone in the country could have his or her enjoyment of human rights set back to dictatorship-era standards, to an extent that will make you question whether Maldives ever transitioned from it, argues Mushfique Mohamed.

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Correcting a wrong with a wrong

After a year of multiple politically motivated trials, domestic and international observers are concerned of continuing due process violations in the Maldives, especially in that of the inquiry against former Vice President Ahmed Adeeb. Correcting a wrong with a wrong will only exacerbate the erosion of rule of law in the country.

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Maldives’ yellow brick road to state of emergency – Part I

The state of emergency is the latest development in a month during which the leader’s paranoid, perhaps even schizophrenic, delusions and hallucinations have become the lived experience of the Maldivian people, writes Dr Azra Naseem.

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Why the Maldives Vice President’s Impeachment is Illegal

“My client, Ahmed Adeeb’s impeachment is illegal. Every incident that follows from this illegal vote should therefore be reversed,” writes Hussain Shameem, the former vice president’s lawyer.

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The Petro Dictatorship

President Abdulla Yameen has a powerful motivation to keep opposition leader Mohamed Nasheed in jail – he threatened the financial interests of the powerful cartel of oil traders who stood to lose billions if the country ditched diesel and converted to solar, argues Mark Lynas.

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A bomb in the heart of Malé

Amidst an escalating struggle for influence at the country’s top leadership, the residents of Malé reacted to the news of Monday’s bomb with skepticism, signaling an unprecedented loss of confidence in the security forces and the government.

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An era of new partnerships

Achieving global goals or the SDGs by 2030 is only possible if private sector does its fair share, writes Ms. Shoko Noda, the UN Resident Coordinator, and Mr. Vikram Sinha, the Chief Executive Officer of Ooredoo Maldives.

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Why the sentence on death by stoning is unconstitutional

The decision contravenes provisions that emphasize non-discrimination, equality, human dignity and fair trial rights in the constitution and international human rights conventions that the Maldives is signatory to, argues Shahindha Ismail and Mushfiq Mohamed.

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The explosion on Yameen’s speedboat: What we know so far

The cause of an explosion on President Abdulla Yameen’s speedboat remains unclear, but here are the important details of the inquiry, which has seen the arrest of three soldiers, a shakeup of the security forces and raids on government offices, and homes of a businessman and a top tourism official.

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Ten Questions for the Government of the Maldives

While it is unsurprising that the Government of the Maldives wishes to have a fact-free conversation about the rapidly deteriorating human-rights situation in the country, the international community will not be persuaded by mere repetition of the same claims lacking foundation in law or evidence, writes Jared Genser, legal counsel to former president Nasheed

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The UN Working Group Opinion: Next Steps

While the opinion of the WGAD is a helpful international contribution, it is the Supreme Court that ought, in accordance with the rule of law, have the final word on the fairness of Mohamed Nasheed’s conviction, argues Toby Cadman, partner at Omnia Strategy.

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High hopes for UN opinion on Nasheed’s imprisonment

After months of street protests, hundreds of arrests, and failed talks, the opposition and civil society groups hope a UN opinion on Nasheed’s imprisonment will provide a way forward. But will the government abide by a ruling favorable to Nasheed?

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Why it makes sense to invest in women and children’s health

Spending on the health of women and young people should be considered ‘investments’, because it accrues long-term rights and dividends, to the economy and to society, writes Mr. Chandra Kishore Mishra and Ms. Amina J. Mohammed.

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A Political Trial or the Trial of a Politician?

The case of the former President Mohamed Naseed is in danger of being manipulated for purely political ends. It is therefore important that we remind ourselves of the facts so that judgment does not become clouded, writes Toby Cadman, partner at Omnia Strategy.

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