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Feature & Comment

Our protectors have failed us

The Maldivian police, who have pledged to protect and serve us, have failed us. Stabbings, killings, death threats, and destruction of property are now common in the Maldives. To date, justice has been delivered in only a handful of cases, writes Shafaa Hameed.

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No ordinary crime: The stabbing of Mahfooz Saeed

The stabbing of lawyer Mahfooz Saeed on Friday cannot be easily dismissed as gang violence, an attempted robbery, or an assault by drug addicts, writes Hassan Mohamed.

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Keeping up with the authoritarians

Why is the international community reluctant to let go of the ‘democracy’ label for the Maldives? Does it arise from a fear of acknowledging defeat, or is it simply because international actors are not keeping up with the authoritarians in the Maldives? asks Azra Naseem.

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Video threats, religious extremism and Maldives tourism

Whether the video message threatening to kill the president and harm tourism is authentic or a hoax, it does a lot of harm for the Maldives’ reputation as a safe and paradise-like honeymoon destination, writes Hawwa Kareem

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Looking for new hope

In Malé, anger at the government is palpable, so is frustration and a certain amount of despair. At a loss as to what to do, many Maldivians are calling for mass protests and urging the international community to intervene, writes Shafaa Hameed.

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Malé under water: frequent floods demonstrate climate vulnerability

A few hours of heavy rain in Malé City on Monday morning inundated streets, snarled traffic, flooded the main hospital and caused a roof to cave in at a primary school, prompting concern over the island city’s vulnerability to and lack of preparedness for extreme weather.

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Drawing the wrong lessons from Singapore

President Yameen and his cabinet tout Singapore as a development model for the Maldives. They admire its combination of prosperity and one-party rule. But if they conclude authoritarianism is behind Singapore’s success, they are drawing the wrong lesson, writes Hawwa Kareem

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Find Moyameehaa – we persevere because we love

Rilwan’s abduction was aimed at killing our hopes for a better world, for what is possible only dies when hope dies. So today, I resolve to put aside despair, to never give up hope, to never give into fear and to never be silenced, writes Zaheena Rasheed.

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A year ago today, our brother, friend and fellow reporter disappeared

Today, August 8, marks one year to the day our brother, friend and fellow journalist Ahmed Rilwan disappeared. The international community must intervene urgently to pressure the government to seek foreign forensic expertise and conduct an independent inquiry, writes the Find Moyameehaa team.

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A council in name only

The government’s dismal treatment of the Malé City councilors and their staff feel like an act of reprisal against the residents of Malé, simply for having voted for the opposition, writes Mohamed Saif Fathih.

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A letter for my grand daughter

In a letter to her future grand daughter, Sea, a Maldivian writer, reflects on the meaning of home in a country marred by corruption.

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Judges’ integrity and ethics in question five years after life appointment

Data published by the JSC show there are now only 14 judges who lack the required academic qualifications. But the JSC’s performance in investigating complaints against judges remained dismal. Only 39 of 150 complaints were fully investigated in 2014.

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In Maafushi, guesthouses worry erosion may drive tourists away

On Maafushi, the island that pioneered guesthouse tourism, business is booming. But today, guesthouse owners worry severe beach erosion may drive tourists away.

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What we talk about when we talk about independence

“Why do we not rejoice in our fiftieth year of independence? Why is the air thick with negativity?” asks Shahindha Ismail

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The Golden Years, A Golden Celebration – by James Dauris

“A relationship founded on an agreement of protected independence in the past has developed into a relationship today that is wide-ranging and contemporary,” writes James Dauris, the British High Commissioner to the Maldives.

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On golden jubilee of independence, Addu is silent

The people of Addu say their development took a U-turn since the British left in 1976. Successive governments have neglected Addu, turning it into a provincial backwater.

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A lingering longing for self-rule

In Addu, on the eve of the Golden Jubilee of independence, stories of the short-lived United Suvadive Republic are told and retold and the longing for self rule lingers on.

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